On a real asshole

dearcoquette:

Assholes have to come from somewhere. And its well known that American women, especially, have a preference for Alphas and Betas who, in our dog-eat-dog, laissez-faire socio-economic climate, are naturally and neccesarily Assholes. They in turn have kids that turn out to be, you guessed it, assholes. If women were to be less alpha-seeking there would in turn be fewer assholes. If they were to be more alpha-seeking there would in turn be more assholes. Direct correlation and causation. That “misogynist hate speech” Is true whether you like it or not.


You submitted this ignorant turd of a response twenty-three times in a row. Hell, you were still submitting it as I posted this. Do you have any idea how fucking creepy that is? Ugh. You’re a creepy creeping creep. Know that about yourself.

You’re also just plain wrong, and you don’t get to claim that your misogynistic point of view is well known. In fact, whenever you feel the self-satisfied urge to use the phrase “it’s well known,” just substitute the phrase “creeps believe” so that at least you’ll be telling the truth.

Now, as for what you creeps believe, please just stop. You’re wrong, not just on the face of things, but deep down to the core of your very being. You’re wrong at such a fundamental level, that even bothering to pick apart the wrongness of your conclusions is a waste of everyone’s fucking time.

Your argument is a jumble of failed logic and self-righteous frustration that hinges on the ridiculous notion that being an asshole is some kind of hereditary taxonomic distinction. It’s not.

For instance, you’re an asshole. Where did you come from? Is it because your mother had a preference for alphas? (Alpha and beta are ethological terms that none of you idiots ever use properly, by the way.) No, you’re not an asshole because your mother has a preference for alphas. That’s insane. You’re an asshole because you walk around with a sense of entitlement with regard to women, and when women don’t treat you how you feel you deserve to be treated, you blame everyone except the loser in the mirror.

You wanna know where real assholes come from? Real assholes are the end result of misogynistic belief systems like the one you so desperately need to be true. Real assholes are the ones who think they’re the put-upon “nice guys” who never realize how fundamentally disrespectful they are to women. Real assholes listen to the absurd rantings of uber-assholes like Stefan Molyneux and then use his angry shit-stack of pseudo-sociological nonsense to try and justify all their simmering narcissistic rage.

You, sir, are a real asshole.

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

You Keep Using That Word. I Do Not Think It Means What You Think It Means.

brandonbird:

On a recent Saturday in Los Angeles, one could attend a Pee-Wee Herman art show at Meltdown, a pop-up Nicolas Cage art show (a port of an earlier Nicolas Cage art show put on in San Francisco), and a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles art show at I Am 8-bit (not to be confused with the official Nickelodeon-sponsored Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles show held a week earlier at Nucleus*). There have been *at least* three Bill Murray art shows that I’m aware of, not counting any Ghostbusters-specific art shows, of which I have entirely lost count. The word that often gets used to describe these shows is tribute. “Well, it’s a tribute,” I remember Jensen of Gallery 1988** saying when discussing the legality of one of their bajillion pop-cult shows, as though invoking the word and its reverent connotations was an instant fair-use forcefield. The thing is, well, this is a tribute:

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And this:

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And here’s another:

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If you love the Bible, these candles might be totally awesome. But to a non-believer, a tribute means nothing. They are offerings to the thing being depicted, to reaffirm the faith of the maker and those in the pews. Smash-cut to the present, and our tributes take the form of a bunch of paintings crammed into in a gallery, that seem to exist only to say, “Hey, we all saw this one movie and think it’s cool, right?”

I wonder, sometimes, if I accidentally started this whole thing—back in college, I put on an exhibit of artwork inspired by Edward Norton. I wonder if people saw that show, or the early 8-Bit/Cult shows, and thought, “All you need is a theme. Pick a thing you like, get people to draw pictures of it, BOOM, art show.” But theme is nothing without concept. Edward Norton was the theme of that 2002 show, but the actual concept was that it would be funny to see a room filled with Edward Norton art. Funny because there is no fucking reason a room should ever be filled with art of Edward Norton; it was a joke on the expectations of an art show. It wasn’t (sorry, Edward Norton!) about how cool a guy Edward Norton is.

A good show concept, in my mind, should bring out the personality and sensibility of each artist. It should almost be a problem that the artist has to engineer his or her way out of. One of the most popular things I’ve ever painted was done, oddly enough, for a group show. No One Wants to Play Sega with Harrison Ford:

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The theme of the show was “8-bit video games.” Now, I had seen pieces from the previous year’s exhibit and they were mostly depictions of Mario, Link, etc. However, I never played Nintendo. We had a Sega Master System. I knew if I drew Sega characters (this was pre-Sonic, so I’m talking Alis, Opa Opa, etc.) no one would have a clue who they were. So my challenge was to somehow use the system itself, and the image became about the actual experience of playing video games, of not having the popular system, etc. I ended up making a better piece, a a piece with emotional content, because the idea of the show made me place constraints on myself.

Being a massive hypocrite, I have continued to curate my own pop culture shows in recent years. I put together a Jurassic Park show, with the stipulation that there could be no depictions of dinosaurs, only humans. Which meant artists had to get a little creative, zeroing in on particular aspects of the film and its stars. Putting that one constraint on the art, I feel, moved the show away from advertisement/celebration/fan wankery and into the realm of weird commentary. Erin Pearce, for example, dressed beetles in the clothes of the main characters: 

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John Larriva drew a Michelangelo/Ian Malcolm parallel:

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And Jeff Ramirez made us look, really look, at a gorgeous movie star’s face:

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Earlier this year, I based a show around an X-Men coloring book. Each artist picked a page from the book and made a new piece in some way inspired by it (I should mention, the book was terrible):

Kelsy Abbott:

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Good ol’ Jeff Ramirez again:

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Joel Fox:

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This concept, to me, was about the transformative leap. You could see, there on the gallery wall, each artist making a connection and running with it. If you happen to like X-Men and/or think Gambit is stupid, hey, that’s a nice bonus, but it’s not central to the enjoyment of the art.

I’m not saying any of this to poo-poo group shows in general. I also don’t want to come off like I’m saying, “Wah wah, my ideas are better!” What I’m trying to demonstrate is, Yes, pop culture is neat, and you don’t have to shy away from it as subject matter. It gives us a huge shared vocabulary to draw from (example: the title of this essay). But wouldn’t it be great if we tried a little harder to do something with that vocabulary? It is my experience that if you give an artist a challenge, they will absolutely rise to it.

*I tend to like the shows Nucleus puts on, because they have a curatorial or museum aspect. For example, if they are doing a show related to a property, they will involve creators from the property and include concept art and things like that. Not surprisingly, it is run by people with art backgrounds.

**Did you know: a number of Gallery 1988 group shows are paid commercials. Artists are being used to advertise Lost, or make chickens hip in anticipation of Disney’s Chicken Little.  

rstevens:

Tonight’s comic is for REAL GAMERZ ONLY. Do not read unless you are TRUO GAMRE

rstevens:

Tonight’s comic is for REAL GAMERZ ONLY. Do not read unless you are TRUO GAMRE

thisshitfunny:

thatdudeemu:

queerasfuck88:

Jon Stewart Goes After Fox in Powerful Ferguson Monologue

I been waiting for the daily show to come back so they could cover this

Jon rip them boys a new asshole 

ninjasexfarty:

Important, always-relevant comic done by the wonderful Ursa Eyer.

teenagesuccubus:

Exactly

teenagesuccubus:

Exactly

theonion:

Unpopular Police Officer Thinking About Committing Racially Motivated Offense For A Little Support

catandkitty:

do you know why feminism has a horrible image?

i’ll let you in on a secret here, it’s because people hate women

dobeytheshark:

Wow Guardians of the Galaxy looks great

dobeytheshark:

Wow Guardians of the Galaxy looks great